Posts about Posts about bartleblog (old posts, page 2)

2007-05-05 18:29

Giving BartleBlog the push it needs

I found a couple of hours to hack, and decided to spend them on BartleBlog.

Here's what got done:

  • UI for blog preferences (still need to do maybe ten of these little modules).
  • Search for files in reasonable places (instead of using the DB in the current folder, for example).
  • Started work on a first-use wizard
  • Started working on a original and simple help system (resource files, yay! ;-).
  • Implemented (lamely) posting of "stories" which are static pages that are not part of the blog's flow.

I intend to spend a couple of hours on it every day for the next ten days or so. After that, who knows, maybe a release will be reasonable.

2007-04-12 17:35

New BartleBlog Feature: marketspeak!

Now, I don't know if this is useful, but I do think it's way neat.

Inspired by S5, rst2s5, and mootools I took an hour (or two) and hacked this neat little slide tool.

The goals differ from S5 in that I intend to write a frontend, so that you have a sort of very-poor-man's powerpoint, but also in that the output should be simple to embed in other pages so that I can eventually make this a part of bartleblog.

Check it out (click to go to next slide, move mouse to the top of the slideshow for controls):

<<   >>

Why use BartleBlog

(If you are a nerd)

Author: Roberto Alsina <[email protected]>

It's nerd-oriented

It's trivial to display source code, with proper syntax highlighting.

from base64 import *
def myFirstFunction():
      print b64decode ('YnllIHdvcmxkIQ==')

Even for things like shell sessions. Dammit, I am a nerd, I will try to add every nerd feature I deem cool.

It does things simply

Wanna show a flickr photo?

.. flickr:: myPhotoTitle

How about using openomy.com to share your files? And whatever else you can think of, it probably can be done.

It's very easy to extend

Really. It's simple python code.

  • The module to do syntax highlighting has 41 lines.
  • The module to do dynamic animated menus has 103.
  • The module to do calendars has 72.

If there is a python module or web service to do what you want, hooking it into BartleBlog is simple.

And it has kickass features

Like online, embedded, animated slideshows! Like this one! Done with 65 lines of simple almost-plain-text markup! Ok, it's not fully implemented yet, because it needs some manual code, but the hard part is done!

Or automatic SVN changelog display ( I admit that's somewhat niche ;-))

Now, who else has that kind of thing?

There may be an artifact when you slide out the syntax-highlighted boxes, but I have no idea how to fix it.

Also, I have not tested it at all in IE, so if it fails there, don't worry, that's to be expected!

Next time I speak in public, I may use this :-)

And, as a teaser... this is the source for the presentation you just saw:

Why use BartleBlog
==================

(If you are a nerd)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

:author: Roberto Alsina <[email protected]>

It's nerd-oriented
------------------

It's trivial to display source code, with
proper syntax highlighting.

.. code-block:: python

  from base64 import *
  def myFirstFunction():
        print b64decode ('YnllIHdvcmxkIQ==')

Even for things like shell sessions.
Dammit, I am a nerd, I will try to add every nerd
feature I deem cool.


It does things simply
---------------------

Wanna show a flickr photo?

.. code-block:: rst

  .. flickr:: myPhotoTitle

How about using openomy.com to share your files?
And whatever else you can think of, it probably
**can** be done.

It's very easy to extend
------------------------

Really. It's simple python code.

* The module to do syntax highlighting has 41 lines.

* The module to do dynamic animated menus has 103.

* The module to do calendars has 72.

If there is a python module or web service to do what you
want, hooking it into BartleBlog is simple.

And it has kickass features
---------------------------

Like online, embedded, animated slideshows! Like this one!
Done with 65 lines of simple almost-plain-text markup!
Ok, it's not fully implemented yet, because it needs some manual
code, but the hard part is done!

Or automatic SVN changelog display ( I admit that's *somewhat niche* ;-))

Now, who else has that kind of thing?

2007-04-10 23:13

Son of BartleBlog XIV: Moo

A new gadget: Mootools based menus.

It takes the same data format I used for the Yahoo UI menubar, and creates a dynamic, sliding, animated, pretty, works-on-lynx menu.

No screenshot because it makes no sense without the movement. You can see it at the top of the sidebar (click on the darker items, outside the links... that needs work).

And yes, that means this blog has, right now, two menus with exactly the same data in them. And on a non-JS browser both are fully expanded.

But that's just temporary ;-)

2007-04-08 20:22

Son of BartleBlog XIII: your blog software doesn't do this

The nerdiest feature of all time... simple SVN logs.

Here's the RST code:

.. svnlog:: https://ra-blog.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/
  :limit: 3

And here is what it does:


System Message: ERROR/3 (<string>, line 14)

Unknown directive type "svnlog".

.. svnlog:: https://ra-blog.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/
  :limit: 3


You can see the entries are nicely formatted. That's because this restructured text directive connects to your SVN server, retrieves the changelog, parses it, tries to process the individual entries as restructured text, and then formats and spits it out again.

I decided to add the recursive parsing because I tend to format everything I write as valid restructured text anyway. But that means I can include images, tables, files, and even other logs in my entries.

How is it useful? Well, I intend to have my projects' pages written using this. This way I don't need to keep a changelog.

Also, I bet the title is right ;-)

2007-04-08 18:20

Son of BartleBlog XII: post in mere seconds

It was pretty hard, but I finally managed to make bartleblog re-render only the necessary pages.

In fact, now my blog has a few less pages because some random stuff was generated in the past, and never got deleted.

There are still some bugs but, with this, it's a reasonably useful app.

Todo:

  • Alternative comment system based on JS-Kit
  • Flickr photoset directive
  • Nicer Openomy tag directive
  • Flickr and Openomy uploading
  • Many config pages and wizards
  • Background rendering
  • Lots of UI love
  • FeedBurner support to automatically use their version of the RSS feeds

Other than that, it's pretty much feature-complete, or at least it has enough features a nerd can use it to post a blog just like this one, for whatever that's worth.

2007-04-05 14:37

Son of bartleblog XI: the highlight of the syntax

I had a few minutes waiting for yum to do its thing and added a couple of easy features:

bartleblog9

The SilverCity-based code-block syntax highlighting directive was replaced with a version using Pygment which supports more languages and is (I think) nicer looking... and comes with several styles, as you can see above in the configuration dialog.

Other than that, I added support in the backend to:

  • Regenerate HTML from RST everywhere
  • Do the same only on items marked "dirty"
  • A model thingie that shows if there are posts or stories with RST errors
  • Some GUI love

I need to make the config dialog support more than one gadget at the same time, though ;-)

2007-04-04 11:01

Son of BartleBog X: Lots of small things are a big thing

  • I did the tag editor:
bartleblog7

The "Guess Tags" button in the composer uses the "Magic words" defined for each tag to give you a starting set, which you can edit later. Still has a few implementation issues (thus the taglessness of this post) but it's almost there.

  • Using HTMLTidy I made all the HTML validate (as transitional, at least).
  • Using browsercam I made sure this page works on every decent browser (it looks bad on IE 4.0, and Netscape 6):
bartleblog8

There is a nasty problem with IE and JavaScript, where if you have a <script> that does some specific things inside of a <div> it tends to give a weird "Operation aborted" dialog after showing part of the page, and then delete what you were seing. That is a known, confirmed bug, and has been there for three major versions already.

  • Added a feedBox widget that can display as a sidebar any feed that uses FeedBurner's BuzzBoost (see "Latest comments" on the sidebar).

I am now toying with using FeedBurner's API to (optionally) automatically publish all the RSS feeds BartleBlog generates there, thus making this kind of thing more transparent.

2007-04-03 19:06

Son of BartleBlog IX: Eating my own dog food

Even though it's not really ready, I am switching my blog to BartleBlog.

The idea is that I do blog. So I should be able to focus on what's needful for my own kind of blog. For example, right now, the idea of not being able to tag this post is driving me nuts.

2007-04-02 12:42

Son of bartleblog VIII: Some Qt love

Now that the backend is still iffy but generates a blog, I finally started showing some love to the UI.

Here's the brand new post editor:

bartleblog6

The far-right two buttons should let you choose your flickr photo/openomy file respectively and add the link/thumbnail easily (the UI is not done yet).

The format to write is Restructured Text or HTML (non wysiwyg) but other things like Textile or wiki markup should be easy to add.

The main window uses a Qt model to create the tree with views (right now) by date, but with alternative organizations soon.

2007-03-29 18:43

Son of Bartleblog VI: The flickr directive

I added a Restructured Text directive that takes as argument the title of one of your (my) flickr pictures, like this:

.. flickr:: pa120071

And produces this:

Which is much nicer than my images have looked for a while.

It can still be improved, probably add a caption, link to image comments if available, etc.

The bad side is that if you don't have internet access the rendering fails.

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