2005-03-15 23:59

Source-based distributions, the good side.

I am no fan of source-based distributions. I think that for most practical purposes, a distribution where installing KDE takes over a day (I own a lowly Duron as my fast computer) is useless.

However, they are good for one particular niche.

Custom distributions. Weird distributions. Personal distributions.

I have several computers. Most of them too slow and small.

As I was considering reinstalling Linux on my Libretto for fun, I looked at what was installed in it, and decided that really, 90% of it was of no use whatsoever.

The problem was, since it had Debian installed, it has a rather wide network of dependencies that simply could not be done without.

On a regular computer, that's not an issue, but in this tiny workhorse, with 16MB of RAM and a 800MB HD, it makes a lot of difference. The smallest I could get Debian to be, and still have network, PCMCIA and X11, was about 250MB.

And the performance was not awesome, either (but not terrible).

So, what would happen if instead of a regular distribution it had something like this:

  • uClibc instead of glibc
  • runit instead of SYSVinit
  • dropbear instead of OpenSSH
  • X built as kdrive (formerly tinyX)
  • python/qt (or maybe python/fltk) for basic admin tools

And so on. Basically rejigger the whole software selection slanting it towards the small side, and dropping a bazillion non-fundamental dependencies along the way.

Well, it can be done. It's just that it's a heck of a lot of work. But here, a source-based distribution gives you a headstart.

For example, I decided to start from ucrux, a uClibc-based port of Crux. Since the native toolchain in ucrux is uClibc, I don't have to worry much about a whole class of mess that happens when you build uClibc-based binaries on a glibc-based system (it's practically cross-compiling).

Qemu lets me install ucrux and work on it somewhat faster than on the target P75 (if I could make KQEmu work I'd be happiest).

Since crux's software packaging mechanism is simplicity itself (a shell script that installs to a fake root), although it's severely underpowered (no dependencies), I can start from ucrux, hack the build of one package at a time, then put everything on a CD very quickly.

So, if you want to hack your own distribution, Crux (or some other similar kit) is quite a nice thing.

For general use... well, my requirements start at apt-get or equivalent ;-)

Now, if only TinyCC worked for more programs, that P75 would be a pocket development powerhouse!

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