Skip to main content

Ralsina.Me — Roberto Alsina's website

The Outhouse and the Mall

Wear­ing the soft­ware en­gi­neer's hat: Code is the most triv­ial and the least im­por­tant part of a fea­ture.

—Michael Ia­trou

Michael tweet­ed that, I replied, he replied, but what the heck, I think some­times things can be bet­ter ex­plained in more than 140 char­ac­ter­s, thus this post 1.

So, why the mall and the out­house? Be­cause when we talk about soft­ware and code and fea­tures, we are not all talk­ing about the same thing. Imag­ine if I told you that bricks are triv­ial. Af­ter al­l, they have ex­ist­ed in their cur­rent form for thou­sands of years, they are pret­ty sim­ple to man­u­fac­ture, and have no in­ter­est­ing fea­tures, re­al­ly, ex­cept a cer­tain re­sistence.

Now, sup­pose you are build­ing an out­house. Since you are a fun­ny guy, you want to build an ac­tu­al brick out­house so you will use bricks to do it.

Now, since bricks are so bor­ing, you may feel com­pelled to be­lieve bricks are the least im­por­tant part of your ed­i­fice, and that the over­all de­sign is more im­por­tan­t. Should you carve a moon-shaped hole in the door? How deep should the la­trine be?

How­ev­er, that po­si­tion is fa­tal­ly flawed, since if you ig­nore those triv­ial, bor­ing brick­s, all you have is shit in a hole in the ground. That is be­cause you are con­sid­er­ing the bricks as just a mean to your end. You on­ly care about the bricks in­so­far as they help you re­al­ize your grand out­house vi­sion. I am here to tell you that you are wrong.

The first way in which you are wrong is in that ar­ti­fi­cial sep­a­ra­tion be­tween means and end­s. Ev­ery­one is fa­mil­iar with the eth­i­cal co­nun­drum about whether the ends jus­ti­fy the mean­s, but that's garbage. That'swhat you say when you try to con­vince your­self that do­ing things hap­haz­ard­ly is ok, be­cause what you do is just the means to what­ev­er oth­er thing is the end. Life is not so eas­i­ly di­vid­ed in­to things that mat­ter and things that don't.

Your work, your cre­ation is not just some ide­al iso­lat­ed end to­wards which you trav­el across a sea of dirty mean­s, try­ing to keep your sil­ver ar­mour clean. It's one whole thing. You are cre­at­ing the mean­s, you are cre­at­ing your goal, you are re­spon­si­ble for both, and if you use shod­dy brick­s, your out­house should shame you.

In the same way, if you do crap­py code, your fea­ture is de­meaned. It may even work, but you will know it's built out of crap. You will know you will have to fix and main­tain that crap for years to come, or, if you are luck­y, ru­in your kar­ma by dump­ing it on the head of some poor suck­er who fol­lows your step­s.

I am pret­ty much a ma­te­ri­al­ist. If you re­move the code, you don't have a fea­ture, or soft­ware, you have a con­cep­t, maybe an idea, per­haps a de­sign (or maybe not) but cer­tain­ly not soft­ware, just like you don't have a brick out­house with­out pil­ing some damn bricks one on top of the oth­er.

I al­ways say, when I see some­one call­ing him­self a soft­ware en­gi­neer, that I am mere­ly a soft­ware car­pen­ter. I know my tool­s, I care about them, I use them as well as I can ac­cord­ing to my lights 2 and I try to pro­duce as good a piece of fur­ni­ture as I can with what I am giv­en.

This tends to pro­duce hum­ble soft­ware, but it's soft­ware that has one re­deem­ing fea­ture: it knows what it should do, and does it as well as I can make it. For ex­am­ple, I wrote rst2pdf. It's a pro­gram that takes some sort of tex­t, and pro­duces PDF files. It does that as well as I could man­age. It does noth­ing else. It works well or not, but it is what it is, it has a pur­pose, a de­scrip­tion and a goal, and I have tried to achieve that goal with­out em­bar­ras­ing my­self.

My pro­grams are out­hous­es, made of care­ful­ly se­lect­ed and con­sid­ered brick­s. They are not fan­cy, but they are what they are and you know it just by look­ing at them. And if you ev­er need an out­house, well, an out­house is what you should get.

Al­so, peo­ple tend to do weird stuff with them I nev­er ex­pect­ed, but that's just the luck of the anal­o­gy.

But why did I men­tion malls in the ti­tle? Be­cause malls are not out­hous­es. Malls are not done with a goal by them­selves be­yond mak­ing mon­ey for its builder­s. The ac­tu­al func­tion of a piece of mall is not even known when it's be­ing built. Will this be a Mc­Don­ald­s, or will it be a com­ic book store? Who knows!

A mall is built quick­ly with what­ev­er makes sense mon­ey­wise, and it should look bland and recog­nis­able, to not scare the herd. It's a build­ing made for pedes­tri­an­s, but it's in­tend­ed to con­fuse them and make the path form A to B as long and me­an­der­ing as pos­si­ble. The premis­es on which its de­sign is based are all askew, cor­rupt­ed and self­-­con­tra­dict­ing.

They al­so give builders a chance to make lots of mon­ey. Or to lose lots of mon­ey.

Nowa­days, we live in an age of mall soft­ware. Peo­ple build star­tup­s, get fi­nanc­ing, build crap­py soft­ware and some­times they hit it big (Twit­ter, Face­book) or, more like­ly, fade in­to ob­scu­ri­ty leav­ing be­hind noth­ing at al­l, ex­cept mon­ey lost and sad pro­gram­mers who spent nights cod­ing stuff noone will ev­er see or use, and not much else.

Far from me say­ing star­tups are not a no­ble or wor­thy en­deav­our. They are! It's just that peo­ple who work on them should re­al­ize that they are not build­ing soft­ware. That's why code does­n't look im­por­tant to them, be­cause they are ac­tu­al­ly sell­ing eye­balls to ad­ver­tis­er­s, or col­lect­ed per­son­al da­ta from their users to who­ev­er buys that, or cap­tive pub­lic for game de­vel­op­er­s, or what­ev­er your busi­ness mod­el says (if you have one!).

They are build­ing mall­s, where the val­ue is not in the build­ing, which is pret­ty ghast­ly and use­less by it­self, but on the peo­ple in it, those who rent space in the mal­l, those who will use the mal­l, the soft­ware, the so­cial net­work, what­ev­er it is you are build­ing.

Twit­ter is not soft­ware, Face­book is not soft­ware. If they were, iden­ti.­ca and di­as­po­ra would be big­ger! What they are is peo­ple in one place, like a mall is not a re­al build­ing, but a col­lec­tion of peo­ple un­der a roof.

So, there is noth­ing wrong with build­ing mall­s. Just re­mem­ber that your ends and your means are one and a whole, that code is im­por­tan­t, that with­out code Face­book and Twit­ter don't work, and that with­out peo­ple they are a bad­land, and know what you are do­ing.

Be­cause the on­ly hard thing in life is know­ing what you want to do. The rest is the easy part. And be­cause malls with­out toi­lets suck.

1

If you re­al­ly want to see the whole con­ver­sa­tion, it's here: http://­bet­tween.­com/ralsi­na/i­a­trou (if any­one knows a bet­ter con­ver­sa­tion track­er please post it in a com­men­t).

2

Yet here I am, an En­gi­neer­ing Man­ag­er at Canon­i­cal. Sor­ry guys!

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (Extraordinary Voyages, #6)

Review:

The prose is not easy to read, be­cause of the book's age, but it's what it is, and it's a clas­sic tale.

Should a kid read it? No. He should prob­a­bly try a mod­ern­ized or abridged ver­sion if there's any good ones. But some old­er kids may en­joy the im­mer­sion in an­oth­er era that comes from it.

Al­so, it's writ­ten pret­ty much like a blog, if you want to be all hip about it ;-)

A new stage, blah blah blah

You sure­ly have seen a mil­lion posts like this one. Hack­er X starts say­ing what a great time he had at com­pa­ny Y/­col­lege/­mom's base­men­t/the cir­cus and how he will al­ways miss the peo­ple there but any­way it's great to look for­ward to the chal­lenge of life at com­pa­ny Z/unem­ploy­men­t/feng shui con­sult­ing/ele­fant ex­cre­ment shov­el­ing.

Well, this one is pret­ty much the same thing.

I start­ed work­ing at Canon­i­cal to­day. Yes, Canon­i­cal. The Ubun­tu guys. You may won­der what a dyed-in-the-­wool KDE guy is go­ing to do there. Well, it's a job, dude, the 90s called and they want their flame­fest back.

I am the new "Engi­neer­ing Man­ag­er for the Desk­top+ group". What the heck is that? Well, my job is to help a bunch of tal­ent­ed peo­ple I like (at least the ones I've known so far ;-) de­liv­er cool soft­ware.

I will prob­a­bly not be cod­ing much, since this is a grownup job, the kind where in­stead of lines of code you are sup­posed to de­vel­op gas­tric ul­cers and re­ced­ing hair­lines while you herd cats to the clos­est cat shed, but I will prob­a­bly man­age to do some­thing, some­times.

This po­si­tion came at a good time for me. My kid is go­ing to be 4 next year and go to school all day. What the heck was I gonna do at home all day then, watch ani­me? Build killer robot­s? Plan how to con­quer the world?

And what hap­pens to my pre­vi­ous job? Well... I still have it some­how. I own a piece of Net Man­agers (http://net­man­ager­s.­com.ar) but I will be step­ping away from the dai­ly man­age­ment and op­er­a­tion of the busi­ness.

So, ba­si­cal­ly, I in­tend to take the mon­ey and dump the work on the backs of my ca­pa­ble part­ners (just kid­ding). In any case, the com­pa­ny can work just as well with­out me since we can now maybe hire an em­ploy­ee in­stead of pay­ing me, so it's win/win ;-)

On oth­er news, I will still work in the same ta­ble as the last 5 years, do­ing some of the same things, with dif­fer­ent peo­ple. It does­n't sound so big when said like that, uh? Well, I will trav­el more, and there are in­ter­est­ing chal­lenges in this new job.

In short: canon­i­cal, lit­tle cod­ing, still own net­man­ager­s, hap­py guy.

Charla: docutils / rst y sus amigos

Again, span­ish on­ly be­cause it's a video... in span­ish.

Re­sul­ta que me olvidé que sí habían graba­do mi char­la de do­cu­tils y com­pañi­a. Gra­cias a Ger­mán por hac­erme acor­dar y mostrarme adonde es­taba!

Y ... acá es­tá:

Syndrome

Review:

Some may com­plain about the sci­ence in the book and they would be right. I will com­plain about some­thing else: the plot and the writ­ing.

Not on­ly is the plot fu­eled by co­in­ci­dence in a scale that would make any­one no­tice (ex­am­ples? the jour­nal­ist is the son of the bad guy bil­lion­aire *and* the old flame of the ar­chi­tec­t/­ex­per­i­men­tal sub­ject who is the sis­ter of the bad guys's CFO kind of co­in­ci­dences).

There is al­so the ran­dom de­tailed de­scrip­tion of things that don't mat­ter in the least, but al­so make no sense. Here's the de­crip­tion of Alan the door­man:


"When Ally and Knickers walked into her lobby, Alan, the morning doorman, was there, just arrived, tuning
his blond acoustic guitar.
Watching over her condominium building was his day job, but writing a musical for Off Broadway (about
Billy the Kid) was his dream. He was a tall, gaunt guy with a mane of red hair he kept tied back in a ponytail
while he was in uniform and on duty. Everybody in the building was rooting for him to get his show mounted,
and he routinely declared that he and his partner were this close to getting backers. "We're gonna have the
next Rent, so you'd better invest now" was how he put it. Alan had the good cheer of a perpetual optimist and
he needed it, given the odds he was up against."


Then he pats the dog and exchanges two phrases with the protagonist.

I marvel at the idea of a doorman that's allowed to play guitar on the lobby on working hours. With this introduction you may wonder what role Alan plays in the plot. Well, let me quote the only other mention of Alan in the whole book. It comes very near the end.


"The condominium no longer had a doorman. In hopes of trimming costs, the condo board had sent out a secret
ballot on the subject. By a narrow margin the owners had voted to dispense with that particular frill. Although
she missed Alan and his early morning optimism about his Off-Broadway hopes, she realized the economy
was probably timely. "


I rest my case. The plot is just lazy, the science is contrived, and the writing lame. Not a good book.

Contents © 2000-2020 Roberto Alsina