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The Palace of Love (Demon Princes, #3)

Review:

Liked a lit­tle less than the pre­vi­ous one. I know the idea of the De­mon Princes is that they are al­most in­hu­man in their ac­tions and mo­ti­va­tion­s, but this one is stretch­ing it.

Wolf in White Van

Review:

I know it's an un­pop­u­lar opin­ion, but I pre­fer my books with some plot in them.

The Killing Machine (Demon Princes, #2)

Review:

I had not read Jack Vance in a while, and it's my first time read­ing it in eng­lish. It's the first time I pre­fer the trans­lat­ed work.

The need­less­ly old-­fash­ioned vo­cab­u­lary (why scold when you can ob­jur­gate!) makes for a dif­fi­cult read, and the plot is thin enough al­ready. The one-di­men­sion­al­i­ty of the char­ac­ter­s, spe­cial­ly the main one, is ex­plained away on a thin mo­ti­va­tion­al ba­sis.

Of course it al­so has the clas­sic Vance world-build­ing, a feel­ing that it all makes sense and is part of a much larg­er "ev­ery­thing", which is the main re­deem­ing fac­tor.

The Star King (Demon Princes, #1)

Review:

I had not read Jack Vance in a while, and it's my first time read­ing it in eng­lish. It's the first time I pre­fer the trans­lat­ed work.

The need­less­ly old-­fash­ioned vo­cab­u­lary (why scold when you can ob­jur­gate!) makes for a dif­fi­cult read, and the plot is thin enough al­ready. The one-di­men­sion­al­i­ty of the char­ac­ter­s, spe­cial­ly the main one, is ex­plained away on a thin mo­ti­va­tion­al ba­sis.

Of course it al­so has the clas­sic Vance world-build­ing, a feel­ing that it all makes sense and is part of a much larg­er "ev­ery­thing", which is the main re­deem­ing fac­tor.


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