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Crashlander (Known Space)

Review:

It's Lar­ry Niven, you know what you're get­ting. This book col­lects the short sto­ries that fol­low Be­owulf Sha­ef­fer, the pro­tag­o­nist of Neu­tron Star, and the on­ly man to go try reach­ing the core. If you like known space you know who I am talk­ing about.

Titans of Chaos (Chronicles of Chaos, #3)

Review:

It kin­da fiz­zles. The au­thor tries to top ev­ery­thing by just pil­ing things high­er, larg­er aries, more pow­er­ful greek god­s, it ends feel­ing like Drag­onball Z, in­clud­ing the con­stant "dy­ing".

Any­way, it was a fun se­ries.

Fugitives of Chaos (Chronicles of Chaos, #2)

Review:

Less ex­po­si­tion that in the first book of the tril­o­gy, which is a good thing. How­ev­er, I am start­ing to get a feel­ing this whole se­ries is just a game of pa­per/rock­/s­cis­sors where this par­a­digm beats that but is beat­en by the oth­er one. Since there are four paradigm­s, it's al­most a game of pa­per/rock­/s­cis­sors/lizard/spock, but not quite.

Orphans of Chaos (Chronicles of Chaos, #1)

Review:

An en­ter­tain­ing book if you like greek mythol­o­gy and fan­ta­sy.
The con­cept is re­al­ly a good idea (bri­tish stu­dents are ac­tu­al­ly the sons of the ti­tan­s! no, that's not a re­al spoil­er, you can fig­ure it out around page 60), but I am not ter­ri­bly con­vinced by the writ­ing style (and the math is some­what du­bi­ous).

I got the oth­er two thirds of the tril­o­gy and am giv­ing it an op­por­tu­ni­ty.


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