Código Charla PyDay "Como Hacer una API REST en Python, spec first"

El 4/4/2018 di una charla en un PyDay sobre como implementar una API REST a partir de una especificación hecha en Swagger/OpenAPI usando Connexion

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Foto tomada por Yamila Cuestas

Si bien no pude grabar la charla (alguien en la audiencia si lo hizo, pero no me dio el video! Pasame el video, persona de la audiencia!) y no hay slides, acá está el código que mostré, que es relativamente sencillo y fácil de seguir.

Código de la charla

Cualquier cosa pregunten.

PD: Sí, podría hacer la charla en un video nuevo. Sí, me da mucha pereza.

My Git tutorial for people who don't know Git

As part of a book project aimed at almost-beginning programmers I have written what may as well pass as the first part of a Git tutorial. It's totally standalone, so it may be interesting outside the context of the book.

It's aimed at people who, of course, don't know Git and could use it as a local version control system. In the next chapter (being written) I cover things like remotes and push/pull.

So, if you want to read it: Git tutorial for people who don't know git (part I)

PS: If the diagrams are all black and white, reload the page. Yes, it's a JS issue. Yes, I know how to fix it.

I have written half a book

LIke mentioned before I am trying to write a book and ... well, I may be actually making progress? At least the generated PDF is about 170 pages long, which means I have written a bunch in this past month.

I have finished the second of four planned parts, which means I have done about half of it. Since I expect the next two parts to be shorter, it's actually more than that.

The target audience are people who have finished the python tutorial but are not exactly programmers yet. They have the syntax more or less in their heads, but how do you turn that into an actual piece of code?

  • Part 1 is about "prototyping", the process of dumping an idea into rough code.
  • Part 2 is about polishing that rough code into ... not so rough code. Includes a gentle introduction to testing, for example.
  • Part 3 (to be written) is about things that are not code:
    • Git / Gitlab
    • Issues
    • Packaging
    • Setting up a website
    • CI
    • Lots more
  • Part 4 is still to be thought but basically it will cover implementing a large feature from the ground up.

I much appreciate comments about it.

PD: Si, va a haber una traducciń al castellano. O mas bien al argentino. Una vez que lo termine.

I am trying to write a Python book

Once upon a time, I tried to write a book. It did not end well. I was trying to dump a whole lot of knowledge at once. Knowledge I did not really have, to be honest. When I look at that book I see a failed thing.

So, of course, many years later, I am trying again, but with the lessons learned in my mind.

  • It will be a smaller book.
  • I am not also writing a whole tool chain for it.
  • It will be about things I know.

So, what is it?

The temporary title, right now, is something like "Boxes: your second Python book". It says your second Python book because you do need a working knowledge of Python syntax as provided by the official Python Tutorial, but not much else. When there is a particularly hairy piece of code it may link to the tutorial or the reference or something.

The "idea" of the book is to bridge a gap that exists between knowing the basics of reading and writing a language (specially if it's your first!) and being able to effectively using it to create a useful project.

It follows the growth of "Boxes", a simplistic text layout engine, from a vague idea to a fully working, useful, tested, and published piece of software.

It's not there yet, but it's about 25% of the way there.

You can read it here: https://ralsina.gitlab.io/boxes-book/ and the sources are at https://gitlab.com/ralsina/boxes-book

Comments much appreciated!

On Silver Wings (Hayden War Cycle, #1)

  • Author: Evan Currie
  • Rating:
  • See in goodreads
  • Review:

    Good popcorn mil-scifi.

    OTOH, would it KILL writers who create characters from a specific cultural background to spend 5 minutes vetting their names with people from similar backgrounds?

    The main character is called Sorilla Aida. And she's supposed to be mexican. That's about as likely as a character from South Carolina called Skunky.